Meditation Showed Me

Latest Contribution to Nineteen Months.

Gumbootspearlz Photography

JunePerkins_Brisbane_Mercy_172 (c) June Perkins

Meditation showed me: Mercy to light is shade, to darkness is light, to the miserable is joy, to night is day, to drought is rain, to floods is the sun, to suffering is beauty and in that meditation came this bird – the inward light of fire, walking in the spiritual waters of the soul.

“My calamity is My providence, outwardly it is fire and vengeance, but inwardly it is light and mercy. Hasten thereunto that thou mayest become an eternal light and an immortal spirit. This is My command unto thee, do thou observe it.”
-Baha’u’llah, The Hidden Words

You can visit this image and other at inspiring images and quotations Nineteen Months.

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Thou art My robe

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Tully, Australia,© June Perkins

“Thou art My glory and My glory fadeth not; thou art My robe and My robe shall never be outworn. Abide then in thy love for Me, that thou mayest find Me in the realm of glory.” -Baha’u’llah, The Hidden Words

Launching Bahá’í Chronicles

Pearlz Dreaming

heroes

Three years ago, Neda  Najibi started a series on her Facebook page titled ‘Did You Know?’ portraying stories about Bahá’í Heroes and Heroines. She  did this because she noticed there wasn’t a single online location systematically attempting to capture the heroism, struggles, victories, sacrifices, and  the dedication of  past and present Bahá’ís.

The death of Neda’s father (Nassir Najibi 1925-2013) gave her the impetus to launch Bahá’í Chronicles, to honour the many heroes and heroines, past and present, of the Bahá’í Faith.

She undertook the project to honour the memory of her father and feels he has been her guiding light for the past two years of putting this site together. 

The team that have created the site are: Neda Nassir Najibi, Co-Founder and Editor; Vanda Marie Khadem, Co-Founder. Bahá’í Chronicles intentionally does not make mention of the creators’ collegiate years, career environment or achievements but rather…

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Gossamer Healing

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  Creative Commons Feggy Art

For a thousand dreams
a million branches broken
Gossamer Healing

Healing Gossamer
silhouettes her dancers in
her token dreaming

A million branches
beating like a heart drum
Gossamer to comfort

(c) June Perkins

Letters never sent 1# Sounds of Silence

Ripple Poetry

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Image by Ivanneth – Creative Commons

17/07/2015
Brisbane

Dear Mr Simon and Mr Garfunkel,

Do you think it’s time for a sequel to Sounds of Silence?

I couldn’t believe that a certain ‘famous’ person,
who will remain nameless (because I don’t want to be sued)
but we all know who he is,
recently said this song was boring and dated.

He might have had a point.
I’m not sure the rendition of it was anywhere as heart felt
as you both together,
but perhaps that’s because the singers
felt like they were staring into the headlights of fame
and just lost their way. 

Their hearts were in the right place and
I don’t think they were able to perform
it the way they wanted. 

Let’s give them the benefit of the doubt, okay.

Maybe, the aforementioned ‘famous’ person,
just didn’t understand the deeper layers of this song. 
I’m sure…

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How to Write a Poem to change the World

‘I want to change the world,’ said the young poet
‘with a poem that makes you think
long after reading it.

You don’t feel like you were lectured
but something subtle crept into your heart
made a hole that penetrated
all you thought you once were sure of
so you started asking questions.

Questions about what you could do to make
the world more peaceful as one individual
in one family in a number of communities
and in a neighborhood and a country.

And when you reached that point of asking your questions
the hole in your heart became
something that you climbed into, and healed with an action
and whilst your action might not be a poem
it could be a song or a class that you took
at school as a teacher or
maybe you had an opportunity
to do something enormous like make an invention
or start a project, perhaps very small, perhaps very large,
that would heal the world
and thinking back you felt changed because the poem did something
powerful whilst you were reading, it empowered you.’

And the young poet went looking for her poem that could
change the world – with a heart full of love that overflowed, and a strong desire to avoid lecturing others when she was full of questioning holes she herself had to fill- by looking at the poems and poets that had changed her. She sought poetry seeds for a peaceful poet’s tree.

To be continued….

(c) June Perkins

Uncaging the voice, uplifting the spirit – the poetry of Mavash Sabet

A review of poetry from one of the Yaran.

Pearlz Dreaming

‘We shout as loudly as we can but our voices too are caged/and day after day death is denied as well as aid./No one listens, no one hears this wingless bird.’ (Mavash Sabet – ‘The Friends’)

Mavash Sabet’s Prison Poems (George Ronald Press, 2013) have been brought to the English speaking world in delicate and skilful adaptations by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani; she was assisted in this work by both her father and her mother.

Nakhjavani prefers to call them adaptations rather than translations due to the immense difficulty of translating poetry from other languages with absolute accuracy especially with the extra elements of metre and rhyme to combine with meaning and the cultural and spiritual dimensions of language.

It is challenging in the parameters of what should be a short a blog/article to convey the full power and complexity of the spiritual and emotional journey Sabet’s poems will take the reader…

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